Thursday, 28 May 2015

Education systems are not arming students with 21st-century skills, EIU study finds

  • Less than half of students aged 18-25 believe their education is providing them with the skills they need. Only a third of executives are satisfied with the skills of young people entering their companies
  • Students are taking 21st-century skills development into their own hands and are confident in their career prospects
  • The majority of teachers believe their students have a more advanced understanding of technology than they do

Education systems are failing to provide students with the skills they need to succeed in the 21st century, a new studyfrom The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) and sponsored by Google has found. 

The EIU surveyed students, teachers and executives from around the world about their views on skills and teaching. All groups voted problem solving the most critical skill for young people today. Communication and team working were also highly rated.

The majority of students aged 18-25 say these skills are included in their education. But less than half (44%) say the education system is providing them with the skills they need to enter the workforce. Just under half of teachers (49%) say the biggest challenge to their ability to teach 21st-century skills is a lack of time within a strictly regulated curriculum.

Despite the perceived shortcomings of their education, the majority of students are confident in their career prospects. This shows that students are drawing on external sources to build key skills. Almost two thirds of teachers (62%) agree that students are becoming more independent in their learning.

Meanwhile, 85% say that technology has changed the way they teach. But students believe there is still ample room for improvement. Only 23% of students aged 18-25 believe their country's education system is effective at using technology. Tellingly, the majority of teachers (58%) believe their students have a more advanced understanding of technology than they do.

“Our new report shows that while there is consensus on the skills that students need to succeed, students themselves are not satisfied with how they are taught,” says Victoria Tuomisto, editor at The Economist Intelligence Unit. “Governments must therefore support teachers as they adapt their teaching style to the needs of the 21st century.”

To download Driving the skills agenda: Preparing students for the future visit:

http://www.economistinsights.com/analysis/driving-skills-agenda

 

For further information, please contact:

Mathew Hanratty, corporate communications manager

+44 (0)20 7576 8546This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." target="_blank">mathewhanratty@economist.com 

Victoria Tuomisto, editor

+44 (0)20 7576 8310This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." target="_blank">victoriatuomisto@economist.com

Google for Education:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Notes to editors

 

About The Economist Intelligence Unit

The Economist Intelligence Unit is the world leader in global business intelligence. It is the business-to-business arm of The Economist Group, which publishes The Economist newspaper. As the world's leading provider of country intelligence, The Economist Intelligence Unit helps executives make better business decisions by providing timely, reliable and impartial analysis on worldwide market trends and business strategies. More information about The Economist Intelligence Unit can be found at www.eiu.com or follow us on www.twitter.com/theeiu

Google for Education
Since great students are motivated by great teachers, at Google for Education we want to create products designed for the classroom that help educators do what they do best, even better. Our solution is built for learning and includes easy-to-manage, affordable devices like Chromebooks and Android tablets, productivity tools like Google Apps for Education with Classroom, and limitless educational content in Google Play for Education. We believe that with the right tools, teachers can inspire curiosity and students can discover and learn better together, from wherever they are. Learn more atgoogle.com/edu.

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